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English definition of “other”

other

adjective, determiner
 
 
/ˈʌðər/
MORE A1 used to refer to people or things that are similar to or in addition to those you have talked about: I don't like custard - do you have any other desserts? The crops were damaged by rats and other pests. I don't think he's funny, but other people do.Also, extra, and in addition
PART OF SET A2 used to talk about the remaining members of a group or items in a set: Mario and Anna sat down to watch the other dancers. I found one shoe - have you seen the other one?Things remaining
DIFFERENT B1 different from a thing or person that you have talked about: Our train was delayed, so we had to make other arrangements. Ask me some other time, when I'm not so busy.Different and difference
the other side/end (of sth) B1 the opposite side/end of something: Our house is on the other side of town. Go around to the other side and push!Through, across, opposite and against
the other day/week, etc B1 used to mean recently, without giving a particular date: I asked Kevin about it just the other day.In the past
every other day/week, etc happening one day/week, etc but not the next: Alice goes to the gym every other day.Single, double and multiple
other than except: The form cannot be signed by anyone other than the child's parent. [+ to do sth] They had no choice other than to surrender.Excluding
other than that informal except for the thing you have just said: My arm was a bit sore - other than that I was fine.Excluding
(Definition of other adjective, determiner from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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