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English definition of “out of”

out of

preposition
 
 
/aʊt əv/
AWAY FROM B1 used to show movement away from the inside of a place or container: A bunch of keys fell out of her bag. She stepped out of the car and walked towards me.From, out and outside
NO LONGER IN A2 no longer in a place or situation: He's out of the country until next month. I've been out of work for the past year.From, out and outside
MADE FROM B1 used to show what something is made from: The statue was carved out of a single block of stone.Comprising and consisting ofIncluding and containing
BECAUSE OF B2 used to show the reason why someone does something: I only gave her the job out of pity.Connecting words which introduce a cause or reason
FROM AMONG B1 from among an amount or number: Nine out of ten people said they preferred it.Taking and choosing
NOT INVOLVED no longer involved in something: He missed the practice session and now he's out of the team.Excluding
(Definition of out of from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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