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English definition of “pay”

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pay

verb
 
 
/peɪ/ ( past tense and past participle paid)
BUY [I, T] A1 to give money to someone because you are buying something from them, or because you owe them money: Helen paid for the tickets. Did you pay the telephone bill? You can pay by cash or credit card.Paying and spending moneyGiving, providing and supplying
WORK [I, T] B1 to give someone money for the work that they do: She gets paid twice a month. People work for them because they pay well. [+ two objects] We paid them 1000 euros for the work. a paid jobPaying and spending moneyGiving, providing and supplying
ADVANTAGE [I] to be a good thing to do because it gives you money or an advantage: Crime doesn't pay.Useful or advantageous
SUFFER [I, T] to suffer because of something bad you have done: He's certainly paying for his mistakes.Experiencing and suffering
pay attention B1 to look at or listen to someone or something carefully: I missed what she was saying because I wasn't paying attention.Paying attention and being carefulCautious and vigilant
pay sb a compliment to tell someone that you admire something about themPraising and applaudingExaggerating and playing down
pay tribute to sb/sth to thank someone or say that you admire someone or something, especially in public: He paid tribute to his former teacher.Relieved and thankful
pay sb/sth a visit; pay a visit to sb/sth B2 to visit a place or a person, usually for a short timeVisiting
(Definition of pay verb from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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