return noun Meaning in Cambridge Learner Dictionary
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Meaning of "return" - Learner English Dictionary

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return

noun
 
 
/rɪˈtɜːn/
GOING BACK [no plural] B1 an occasion when someone goes or comes back to a place where they were before: On his return to Sydney, he started up a business.Returning to a place
GIVING BACK [no plural] the act of giving, putting, or sending something back: the return of the stolen goodsGiving, bringing or getting backThe postal system
ACTIVITY [no plural] a time when someone starts an activity again: This film marks his return to acting.Starting againStarting and beginning
HAPPENING AGAIN [no plural] a time when something starts to happen or be present again: the return of the platform shoe What we are seeing here is a return to traditional values.Repeating an action
TICKET [C] UK ( US round-trip ticket) B1 a ticket that lets you travel to a place and back again, for example on a train: Could I have two returns to Birmingham?Tickets
PROFIT [C, U] the profit that you get from an investment: This fund has shown high returns for the last five years.Profits and lossesSavings, interest and capital
in return B2 in exchange for something or as a reaction to something: I'd like to give them something in return for everything they've done for us.Reciprocating
SPORTS [C] an occasion when a ball is thrown or hit back to another player in a sports game: She hit an excellent return.General terms used in ball sports
COMPUTER [U] B1 a key on a computer keyboard that is used to make the computer accept information or to start a new line in a document: Type in the password and press return. →  See also day return Computer hardware
(Definition of return noun from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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