short adverb Meaning in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary
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Meaning of “short” - Learner’s Dictionary

short

adverb
 
 
/ʃɔːt/
short of doing sth without doing something: He did everything he could to get the money, short of robbing a bank.Abstaining and refraining
stop short of sth/doing sth to almost do something but decide not to do it: She stopped short of accusing him of lying.AlmostMerely and barely
fall short of sth to not reach a particular level, but only by a small amount: Sales for the first half of this year fell just short of the target.Failing and doing badlyScarce, inadequate and not enoughLacking things
cut sth short to have to stop doing something before it is finished: She had to cut her speech short when the fire alarm went off.Stop having or doing something
Translations of “short”
in Spanish sin alcanzar…
in Vietnamese trước thời hạn chờ đợi…
in Thai โดยสังเขป…
in Malaysian singkat…
in French ne pas atteindre…
in German zu kurz…
in Indonesian tidak sampai…
in Chinese (Simplified) 早, 提前…
in Chinese (Traditional) 早, 提前…
(Definition of short adverb from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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