shot noun Meaning in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary

Meaning of “shot” - Learner’s Dictionary


noun [C]
GUN B2 the action of firing a bullet from a gun: Three shots were fired.Handguns and riflesAiming and aimHand weapons
SPORT B2 an attempt to score points in sports such as football by hitting or throwing the ball: Good shot!General terms used in ball sports
PHOTOGRAPH B2 a photograph: I got a good shot of them leaving the hotel together.Photography
give sth a shot; have/take a shot at sth informal to try to do something, often for the first time: I've never played football, but I'll give it a shot. They might have a shot at the World Championships next year.Trying and making an effortEffort and expending energy
MEDICINE an amount of medicine put into the body with a special needle: I took the dog to the vet for his shots.Drugs - general wordsSpecific types of drug
DRINK a small amount of a strong alcoholic drink: a shot of whiskyAlcohol - general wordsMeasurements of volumeGeneral words for size and amountInformal measurements of volume
→  See also long shot , like a shot , a shot in the dark
(Definition of shot noun from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day


a large group of soldiers who form a part of an army, especially the ancient Roman army

Word of the Day

There is no such thing as a true synonym in English. Discuss!
There is no such thing as a true synonym in English. Discuss!
by Kate Woodford,
November 25, 2015
In the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary the word ‘synonym’ is defined as ‘a word or phrase that has the same or nearly the same meaning as another word or phrase in the same language’. As you might expect, definitions for this word are broadly similar in other dictionaries and yet the italicized

Read More 

conversational user interface noun
conversational user interface noun
November 30, 2015
a computer interface that provides information to users in normal, conversational speech in response to spoken requests Nearly every major tech company—from Amazon to Intel to Microsoft to Google—is chasing the sort of conversational user interface that Kaplan and his colleagues at PARC imagined decades ago.

Read More