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Meaning of “sit” - Learner’s Dictionary

sit

verb     /sɪt/ ( present participle sitting, past tense and past participle sat)
BODY POSITION [I]
A1 to be in a position with the weight of your body on your bottom and the top part of your body up, for example, on a chair: Emma was sitting on a stool. The children sat at the table by the window. We sat by the river and had a picnic.Sitting and standing
MOVE BODY [I] ( also sit down)
A2 to move your body into a sitting position after you have been standing: She came over and sat beside him. She sat down on the grass. Sitting and standing
sit sb down/at/in, etc
to make someone sit somewhere: She sat me down and told me the bad news. I thought we'd sit the children at the end of the table.Sitting and standing
STAY [I]
to stay in one place for a long time and not be used: He hardly ever drives the car. It just sits in the garage.Staying and remainingWaiting
MEETING [I]
If a court, parliament, etc sits, it has a meeting to do its work: The board will be sitting next week.Court cases, orders and decisionsOfficial meetingsMeeting people
TEST/EXAM [T] UK
to take a test or exam: The changes will affect many students sitting their exams this summer. →  See also sit on the fence Exams, tests and exercises
(Definition of sit from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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