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English definition of “snap”

snap

verb
 
 
/snæp/ (present participle snapping, past tense and past participle snapped)
BREAK [I, T] If something long and thin snaps, it breaks making a short, loud sound, and if you snap it, you break it, making a short, loud sound: The twigs snapped as we walked on them. She snapped the carrot in half (= into two pieces).Tearing and breaking into pieces
snap (sth) open/shut/together, etc to suddenly move to a particular position, making a short, loud noise, or to make something do this: She snapped the book shut. The suitcase snapped open and everything fell out.Closing and blocking
SPEAK ANGRILY [I, T] to say something suddenly in an angry way: "I don't know what you mean," he snapped. I was snapping at the children because I was tired.Talking angrily
LOSE CONTROL [I] to suddenly be unable to control a strong feeling, especially anger: She asked me to do the work again and I just snapped.Uncontrolled
PHOTOGRAPH [T] informal to take a photograph of someone or something: Photographers snapped the Princess everywhere she went.Photography
ANIMAL [I] If an animal snaps, it tries to bite someone: The dog was barking and snapping at my ankles. → See also snap your fingersAnimal (non-human) soundsBiting, chewing and swallowingEating
(Definition of snap verb from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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