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English definition of “something”

something

pronoun
 
 
/ˈsʌmθɪŋ/
A1 used to refer to a thing when you do not know what it is or when it is not important what it is: As soon as I walked in, I noticed that something was missing. We know about the problem and we're trying to do something about it. It's not something that will be easy to change. There's something else (= another thing) I wanted to tell you.Something, anything, nothing, and everything
or something (like that) A2 used to show that what you have just said is only an example or you are not certain about it: Why don't you go to a movie or something?Something, anything, nothing, and everything
something like similar to or approximately: He paid something like $2000 for his car.Similar and the sameDescribing people with the same qualitiesApproximate
be something informal to be a thing which is important, special, or useful: The President visiting our hotel - that would really be something. It's not much but it's something (= better than nothing).Unique and unusualGood, better and best in terms of quality
something of a sth used to describe a person or thing in a way which is partly true but not completely or exactly: It came as something of a surprise. He has a reputation as something of a troublemaker.Incomplete
be/have something to do with sth/sb to be related to something or a cause of something but not in a way which you know about or understand exactly: It might have something to do with the way it's made.Something, anything, nothing, and everything
(Definition of something from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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