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Meaning of “soon” - Learner’s Dictionary

soon

adverb     /suːn/
A2 after a short period of time: I've got to leave quite soon. It's too soon to make a decision. He joined the company soon after leaving college.In the future and soon
as soon as
B1 at the same time or a very short time after: As soon as I saw her, I knew there was something wrong. They want it as soon as possible.Simultaneous and consecutiveOrder and sequence
sooner or later
B2 used to say that you do not know exactly when something will happen, but you are sure that it will happen: Sooner or later they'll realize that it's not going to work.In the future and soon
would sooner
would prefer: I'd sooner spend a bit more money than take chances with safety.Liking more
no sooner ... than
used to show that something happens immediately after something else: No sooner had we got home than the phone rang.In the future and soon
(Definition of soon from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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