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English definition of “start”

start

noun
 
 
/stɑːt/
BEGINNING [C] B1 the beginning of something: [usually singular] Our teacher checks who is in class at the start of each day. Ivan has been involved in the project from the start. The meeting got off to a bad start (= began badly).Beginnings and starts
make a start to begin doing something: I'll make a start on the washing-up.Starting and beginningStarting again
for a start used when you are giving the first in a list of reasons or things: I won't be going - I've got too much homework for a start.First and firstly
ADVANTAGE [C] an advantage that you have over someone else when you begin something: [usually singular] I'm grateful for the start I had in life.Advantage and disadvantage
the start the place where a race beginsCompetitions, and parts of competitionsAthletics
SUDDEN MOVEMENT [no plural] a sudden movement that you make because you are frightened or surprised: Kate sat up with a start. → See also false startMaking short, sudden movements
(Definition of start noun from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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