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Meaning of “too” - Learner’s Dictionary

too

adverb     /tuː/
too small/heavy/much, etc
A1 used before adjectives and adverbs to mean 'more than is allowed, necessary, possible, etc': The film is also far too long. There are too many cars on the roads these days. [+ to do sth] I decided it was too early to get up and went back to sleep.Too much and unnecessary
A1 also: Do you know Jason too? I'll probably go there next year too.Also, extra, and in addition
not too
A2 used before adjectives and adverbs to mean 'not very': "How was your exam?" "Not too bad, I suppose." I didn't play too well today.Yes, no and not
Translations of “too”
in Arabic أيْضًا…
in Korean -도…
in Malaysian terlalu, juga…
in French trop, aussi…
in Turkish de, dahi…
in Italian anche, pure…
in Chinese (Traditional) 更多, 太, 過於…
in Russian тоже…
in Polish też, także…
in Vietnamese rất, cũng…
in Spanish demasiado, también…
in Portuguese também…
in Thai มากเกินไป, อีกด้วย…
in German (all-)zu, auch…
in Catalan també…
in Japanese ~も(また)…
in Indonesian terlalu, juga…
in Chinese (Simplified) 更多, 太, 过于…
(Definition of too from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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