track noun Meaning in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary

Meaning of “track” - Learner’s Dictionary


PATH [C] B1 a narrow path or road: We followed a dirt track off the main road.Pedestrian routes
RAILWAY [C] the long metal lines that a train travels along: UK a railway track/ US a railroad trackRailways and railway lines
RACE [C] B1 a path, often circular, used for races: a race track track eventsSurfaces on which sports take placeAthletics
SPORT [U] US B2 the sport of running in races around a wide circular path made for this sportSurfaces on which sports take placeAthletics
MUSIC [C] B2 one song or piece of music on a CD, record, etcRecording sounds and images
keep track to continue to know what is happening to someone or something: He changes jobs so often - I find it hard to keep track of what he's doing.Knowledge and awareness
lose track B2 to not know what is happening to someone or something any more: I've lost track of how much we've spent.Unaware
on track making progress and likely to succeed: [+ to do sth] A fighter from Edinburgh is on track to become world heavyweight boxing champion. We've got a lot of work to do but we're on the right track.Successful (things or people)
(Definition of track noun from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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