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English definition of “under”

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under

preposition
 
 
/ˈʌndər/
BELOW A1 below something: She pushed her bag under the table. The children were sitting under a tree.Under and below
BELOW THE SURFACE A1 below the surface of something: He could only keep his head under the water for a few seconds.Under and below
LESS THAN A2 less than a number, amount, or age: You can buy the whole system for just under $2000. We don't serve alcohol to anyone under 18.Small in number and quantity
CONTROLLED BY controlled or governed by a particular person, organization, etc: a country under military rule The restaurant is under new management. I'm managing the project and have three people under me.Giving orders and commands
RULE/LAW according to a rule, law, etc: Under the new law, all new buildings must be approved by the local government.Rules and laws
IN A PARTICULAR STATE B2 in a particular state or condition: The President is under pressure to resign. Students are allowed to miss school under certain circumstances.Conditions and characteristics
IN PROGRESS B2 used to say that something is happening at the moment but is not finished: A new 16-screen cinema is under construction. Several different plans are under discussion.Continue and last
NAME using a particular name, especially one that is not your usual name: He also wrote several detective novels under the name Edgar Sandys.Names and titles
PLACE IN LIST used to say which part of a list, book, library, etc you should look in to find something: Books about health problems are under 'Medicine'.Classifying and creating order
(Definition of under preposition from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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