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Turkish translation of “bar”

bar

noun [C]
 
 
/bɑːr/
DRINKING A1 a place where alcoholic drinks are sold and drunk, or the area behind the person serving the drinks
bar, meyhane
I met him in a bar in Soho.Selling and serving alcoholic drinks
BLOCK B1 a small block of something solid
kalıp (çikolata, sabun vb.), parça
a chocolate bar gold bars Words meaning small pieces and amounts
LONG PIECE B2 a long, thin piece of metal or wood
sırık, çubuk, kazık
There were bars on the downstairs windows.Poles, rods, shafts and sticks
PREVENTING SUCCESS UK something that prevents you doing something or having something
bariyer, engel, mania, çıta
Lack of money should not be a bar to a good education.Preventing and impedingLimiting and restricting
MUSIC one of the short, equal groups of notes that a piece of music is divided into
bir müzik parçasının kısa eşit nota gruplarından biri
The band played the first few bars.Technical music terms
the bar lawyers (= people whose job is to know about the law and deal with legal situations) thought of as a group
baro
Haughey was called to the bar (= became a lawyer) in 1949.Law courts
(Definition of bar noun from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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