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Translation of "base" - English-Turkish dictionary

base

noun [C]     /beɪs/
BOTTOM
B2 the bottom part of something, or the part something rests on temel, taban, kaide I felt a sharp pain at the base of my thumb.Under and below
MAIN PART
the most important part of something, from which other things can develop esas, temel, asıl a solid economic baseImportant and essential thingsInformation and messagesBeing based on or depending on something
PLACE
B2 the main place where a person lives or works, or from where they do things çalışma ve yaşama alanı, yeri Keswick is an excellent base for exploring the Lake District.Places and locationsUnpleasant places
ARMY
B2 a place where people in the army or navy live and work üs, askeri üs an American Air Force basePlaces involved in military activityThe armed forces generally
ORGANIZATION
the place where the main work of an organization is done ana karargâh, ana merkez The company's European base is in Frankfurt.Businesses and enterprises
SUBSTANCE
the main substance in a mixture karışımın ana hammadesi paints with an oil baseImportant and essential thingsInformation and messages
BASEBALL
one of the four places in baseball that a player must run to in order to win a point beyzbolda bir oyuncunun mutlaka ulaşması gereken noktalardan biri Baseball and roundersGeneral terms used in ball sports
CHEMISTRY
a chemical substance with a pH (= measure of how acid something is)of more than 7Types of chemicalSpecific chemicals, chemical compounds and gasesSubstances and structures in the body
MATHS
a number that is used as the most important unit in a system of counting: The binary system of counting uses base 2.Numbers generally
(Definition of base noun from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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