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Turkish translation of “block”

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block

noun [C]
 
 
/blɒk/
PIECE B2 a solid piece of something, usually in the shape of a square or rectangle
blok, engel, kütük, kalıp, kütle
a block of ice/stone/woodObjects - general words
DISTANCE US B1 the distance along a street from where one road crosses it to the place where the next road crosses it
iki cadde arasında kalan bölge, mahal
They only live two blocks away from the school.Environments and localities
BUILDING B1 a large building containing many apartments or offices
binalar grubu bir dizi bina, bloklar
UK a block of flats Buildings in generalShops, markets and auctionsRestaurants and cafes
GROUP OF BUILDINGS a square group of buildings or houses with roads on each side
her iki tarafında yol olan ve bir çok binadan oluşan binalar kümesi, blokları
Omar took the dog for a walk round the block.Buildings in generalShops, markets and auctionsRestaurants and cafes
CANNOT THINK If you have a block about something, you cannot understand it or remember it.
anlamakta güçlük, engel, bir şeye kapalı olma
I had a complete mental block about his name.Misunderstanding
STOP PROGRESS something that makes it difficult to move or make progress
engel, tıkanma, tıkanıklık
Preventing and impedingLimiting and restricting
AMOUNT an amount or group of something that is considered together
birlikte düşünülen şeylerin oluşturduğu grup, küme, yığın, blok
This block of seats is reserved. →  See also be a chip off the old block , stumbling block , tower block Groups and collections of thingsVariety and mixtures
(Definition of block noun from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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