cost noun translate English to Turkish: Cambridge Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Translation of "cost" - English-Turkish dictionary

cost

noun     /kɒst/
MONEY [C, U]
A2 the amount of money that you need to buy or do something maliyet, tutar, fiyat, eder The cruise ship was built at a cost of $400 million. Software is included at no extra cost. The cost of living (= the cost of food, clothes, etc) has increased.Costs and expenses
SOMETHING GIVEN [no plural]
B2 something that you give or lose, in order to get or achieve something else bedel He rescued four people at the cost of his own life.Costs and expenses
at all costs
B2 If something must be done at all costs, it is very important that it is done. neye malolursa olsun, ne pahasına olursa olsun We have to succeed at all costs.Very important or urgent
to your cost UK
because of a bad experience you have had edindiği kötü tecrübeye dayanarak/bakarak An ankle injury can last a long time, as I know to my cost.Damaging and spoilingDestroying and demolishing
Translations of “cost”
in Korean 비용…
in Arabic كُلْفة…
in Portuguese custo, gasto…
in Catalan cost, preu…
in Japanese 費用…
in Italian costo…
in Chinese (Traditional) 錢, 價格, 費用…
in Russian цена, стоимость, расплата…
in Chinese (Simplified) 钱, 价格, 费用…
in Polish koszt, cena…
(Definition of cost noun from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
by ,
April 27, 2016
by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

Read More 

Word of the Day

cracker

a thin, flat, hard biscuit, especially one eaten with cheese

Word of the Day

bio-banding noun
bio-banding noun
April 25, 2016
in sport, grouping children according to their physical maturity rather than their age ‘When we’re grouping children for sports, we do it by age groups, but the problem is that, within those age groups, we get huge variations in biological age,’ said Dr Sean Cumming, senior lecturer at the University of Bath’s department for

Read More