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Translation of "crawl" - English-Turkish dictionary

crawl

verb     /krɔːl/
PERSON [I]
B2 to move on your hands and knees emeklemek I crawled under the desk to plug the lamp in.Moving on your hands and legs or on your stomach
ANIMAL [I]
If an insect crawls, it uses its legs to move. (böcek) tırmanmak There's an ant crawling up your leg.Moving on your hands and legs or on your stomach
TRAFFIC [I]
If traffic crawls, it moves extremely slowly. (trafik) gıdım gıdım ilerlemek, çok yavaş ilerlemek We were crawling along at 10 miles per hour.Slow and moving slowly
TRY TO PLEASE [I] UK informal
to try to please someone because you want them to like you or help you yağcılık/yalakalık/dalkavukluk yapmak My brother is always crawling to Mum.Praising insincerely or too eagerly
be crawling with sb/sth
to be full of insects or people in a way that is unpleasant insan/böcek kaynamak, aşırı kalabalık olmak, mahşer günü gibi olmak, dopdolu olmak The kitchen's crawling with ants.Full
(Definition of crawl verb from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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