curse noun translate English to Turkish: Cambridge Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Translation of "curse" - English-Turkish dictionary

curse

noun [C]
 
 
/kɜːs/
MAGIC magic words which are intended to bring bad luck to someone
beddua, lanet okuma
to put a curse on someoneMagic
RUDE WORDS a rude or offensive word or phrase
sövgü, küfür
Swearing and blasphemy
PROBLEM something that causes harm or unhappiness, often over a long period of time
felaket, dert, bela
Traffic is one of the curses of modern living.Damaging and spoilingDestroying and demolishing
Translations of “curse”
in Arabic لَعْنة…
in Korean 저주…
in Malaysian org terkena sumpahan…
in French malheur…
in Italian maledizione…
in Chinese (Traditional) 魔法, 咒語,詛咒,魔咒…
in Russian проклятие, ругательство, бич…
in Polish klątwa, zaklęcie, przekleństwo…
in Vietnamese người bị nguyền rủa…
in Spanish desgracia…
in Portuguese praga…
in Thai สิ่งที่ถูกสาปแช่ง…
in German der Fluch…
in Catalan maledicció…
in Japanese 呪(のろ)い…
in Indonesian terkutuk…
in Chinese (Simplified) 魔法, 咒语,诅咒,魔咒…
(Definition of curse noun from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

More translations of “curse” in Turkish

Word of the Day
public school

in England, an expensive type of private school (= school paid for by parents not by the government)

Word of the Day

Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
by Cambridge Dictionaries Online,
August 27, 2015
The English language is constantly changing. You know that. But did you know that at Cambridge Dictionaries Online we keep track of the changes? We continually add new words and new meanings to our online dictionary for learners of English. Some of them are new to English entirely (neologisms), and some

Read More 

hyperpalatable adjective
hyperpalatable adjective
August 24, 2015
describes food with heightened levels of sugar and salt, intended to be extremely appealing In Brazil, where the prevalence of overweight and obese adults has doubled since 1980, crisps, biscuits, energy bars and sugary drinks formulated to be ‘hyper-palatable’ are much more widely eaten than previously.

Read More