down adverb, preposition translate to Turkish: Cambridge Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Translation of "down" - English-Turkish dictionary

down

adverb, preposition     /daʊn/
LOWER PLACE
A2 towards or in a lower place altta, alta/aşağı doğru The kids ran down the hill to the gate. I bent down to have a look.Down and downwardMoving downwards
LEVEL/AMOUNT
towards or at a lower level or amount belli miktarın altında/altına inen Can you turn the music down? Slow down so they can see us.Raising and lowering
SURFACE
A1 moving from above and onto a surface yukarıdan bir yüzeyin üzerine doğru/üzerinde I sat down and turned on the TV. Put that box down on the floor.Down and downwardMoving downwards
DIRECTION
A2 in or towards a particular direction, usually south güneye doğru/güneyde; aşağı, aşağı doğru Pete's moved down to London.Down and downwardMoving downwards
down the road/river, etc
A2 along or further along the road/river, etc nehir/yol boyunca There's another pub further down the street.Through, across, opposite and against
note/write, etc sth down
B1 to write something on a piece of paper not almak/tutmak; çalakalem yazmak Can I just take down your phone number?Writing and typing
STOMACH
inside your stomach mideye doğru/midede He's had food poisoning and can't keep anything down.Down and downwardMoving downwards
be down to sb UK
to be someone's responsibility or decision (sorumluluk/yükümlülük) ...e düşmek, iş başa düşmek I've done all I can now, the rest is down to you.Duty, obligation and responsibility
come/go down with sth
to become ill yatağa düşmek; yatak, döşek hasta olmak The whole family came down with food poisoning.Being and falling ill
(Definition of down adverb, preposition from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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