far adjective translate to Turkish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "far" - English-Turkish dictionary

far

adjective
 
 
/fɑːr/ (farther, farthest, further, furthest)
B2 [always before noun] describes the part of something that is most distant from you or from the centre
uzak, ötede, uzakta
His office is at the far end of the corridor. They live in the far south of the country.Distant in space and time
the far left/right used to describe political groups whose opinions are very extreme
aşırı sağcı/solcu
→  See also be a far cry from sth Political movements and groups
Translations of “far”
in Arabic أَقْصى, بَعيد…
in Korean (멀리 떨어진) 저 쪽에…
in Malaysian seberang…
in French plus loin, à l’autre bout de…
in Italian lontano…
in Chinese (Traditional) 遠的, 遙遠的, 遠端的…
in Russian дальний…
in Polish daleki, drugi…
in Vietnamese xa hơn…
in Spanish lo más lejos, la otra punta…
in Portuguese masi distante, oposto…
in Thai ห่าง…
in German entfernter…
in Catalan llunyà…
in Japanese 遠い…
in Indonesian seberang…
in Chinese (Simplified) 远的, 遥远的, 远端的…
(Definition of far adjective from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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