field noun translate English to Turkish: Cambridge Dictionary

Translation of "field" - English-Turkish dictionary


LAND [C] A2 an area of land used for growing crops or keeping animals
tarla, otlak, mera, çayır
a wheat field a field of cowsAreas of land where crops are grownFarms and ranches
SPORT [C] B1 an area of grass where you can play a sport
top/futbol sahası
a football fieldSurfaces on which sports take place
AREA OF STUDY [C] B2 an area of study or activity
çalışma alanı/sahası
He's an expert in the field of biochemistry.Subjects and disciplines
IN RACE/BUSINESS [no plural] the people who are competing in a race, activity, or business
yarışma/faaliyet/iş alanı/sahası
We lead the field in genetic research.Competitors and participants in sports and games
a gas/oil field an area of land containing gas or oil
petrol/gaz sahası
FuelsPetroleum products especially when used as fuel
a gravitational/magnetic field an area affected by a particular physical force
yerçekimi/manyetik alan
→  See also paddy field , playing field Particular theories and concepts in physics
(Definition of field noun from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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