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Turkish translation of “find”

find

verb [T]
 
 
/faɪnd/ (past tense and past participle found)
DISCOVER WHEN SEARCHING A1 to discover something or someone that you have been searching for
bulmak,
I can't find my glasses and I've looked everywhere. Police found the missing girl at a London railway station. [+ two objects] Has he found himself a place to live yet?Finding and discovering
DISCOVER BY CHANCE A2 to discover something or someone by chance
bulmak, anlamak
The body was found by a man walking his dog.Finding and discovering
BECOME AWARE B1 to become aware that something exists, or has happened
öğrenmek, farkına varmak
I came home to find that my cat had had kittens.Finding and discovering
find the energy/money/time, etc to have or get enough energy/money/time, etc to do something
bir şeyi yapmak için enerji/para/zaman bulmak
Where do you find the energy to do all these things?Finding and discovering
find sb/sth easy/boring/funny, etc B1 to think or feel a particular way about someone or something
kolay/sıkıcı/saçma/komik bulmak
I still find exams very stressful.Experiencing and suffering
find yourself somewhere/doing sth B2 to become aware that you have gone somewhere or done something without intending to
kendini bir yerde bir şey yapıyor bulmak; tam ortasında bulmak
I suddenly found myself making everyone's lunch.Not expected or planned
be found B2 to exist or be present somewhere
bulunmak
Vitamin C is found in oranges and other citrus fruit.Finding and discovering
find sb guilty/not guilty to judge that someone is guilty or not guilty in a law court
suçlu/suçsuz bulmak
[often passive] She was found guilty of murder.Court cases, orders and decisions
(Definition of find verb from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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