first adverb translate to Turkish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "first" - English-Turkish dictionary

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first

adverb
 
 
/ˈfɜːst/
BEFORE A1 before everything or everyone else
ilk olarak; önde gelen
I can go to the cinema, but I've got to do my homework first. Jason came first in the 400 metres (= he won).First and firstly
FIRST TIME B1 for the first time
ilk defa; ilkinde
I first heard the song on the radio. He first started playing the piano at school.First and firstly
at first B1 at the beginning of a situation or period of time
ilk başta, en başta
At first I thought she was unfriendly, but actually she is just shy.First and firstly
first; first of all B1 used to introduce the first idea, reason, etc in a series
ilk olarak; her şeyden önce
First, I think we have to change our marketing strategy.First and firstly
A2 before doing anything else
ilk başta, ilk önce; öncelikle
First of all check you have all the correct ingredients.First and firstly
come first to be the most important person or thing
önde gelen, önemli
Her career always comes first.First and firstly
put sb/sth first to consider someone or something to be the most important thing
ilk sıraya koymak, önemsemek
Most couples put their children first when sorting out their problems.Being important and having importance
First come, first served. something you say when there is not enough of something for everyone and only the first people who ask for it will get it
İlk gelen alır; sırası gelen alır; sırayla
First and firstly
(Definition of first adverb from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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