free verb translate English to Turkish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "free" - English-Turkish dictionary

free

verb [T]
 
 
/friː/ ( present participle freeing, past tense and past participle freed)
ALLOW TO LEAVE B2 to allow someone to leave a prison or place where they have been kept
serbest bırakmak, salıvermek, tahliye etmek
The last hostages were finally freed yesterday.Freedom to actOpportunity
GET OUT to get someone out of a situation or place that they cannot escape from
kurtarmak, çıkarmak
Firefighters worked for two hours to free the driver from the wreckage.Freedom to actOpportunity
TAKE AWAY to help someone by taking something unpleasant away from them
kurtulmasına yardım etmek
The book's success freed her from her financial worries.Removing and getting rid of thingsTaking things away from someone or somewhere
MAKE AVAILABLE ( also free up) to make something available for someone to use
yer açmak, sağlamak
I need to free up some space for these files.Available and accessiblePresent
(Definition of free verb from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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