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Turkish translation of “go”

go

verb [I]
 
 
/ɡəʊ/ (present participle going, past tense went, past participle gone)
MOVE A1 to move or travel somewhere
gitmek
I'd love to go to America. We went into the house. Are you going by train?General words for movementDeparting
DO SOMETHING A1 to move or travel somewhere in order to do something
bir amaç için gitmek
Let's go for a walk. [+ doing sth] We're going camping tomorrow.General words for movementDeparting
DISAPPEAR B1 to disappear or no longer exist
gözden kaybolmak, yok olmak; yitmek
When I turned round the man had gone.Death and dying
go badly/well, etc B1 to develop in a particular way
iyi/kötü gitmek
My exams went really badly.Occurring and happening
CONTINUE to continue to be in a particular state
belli bir düzende/konumda devam etmek
We won't let anyone go hungry.Continue and last
WORKING B2 to work correctly
düzgün/hatasız çalışmak
Did you manage to get the car going?FunctioningPerforming a function
STOP WORKING B2 to stop working correctly
düzgün çalışmamak, arıza yapmak, iyi gitmemek
Her hearing is going, so speak loudly.Not functioning
MATCH B1 If two things go, they match each other.
uymak, uyuşmak, birbiriyle iyi gitmek
That jumper doesn't go with those trousers.Matching and co-ordinating
TIME B2 If time goes, it passes.
(zaman) geçmek, bitmek, yok olmak
The day went very quickly.Spending time and time passing
SONG B2 to have a particular tune or words
(şarkı) belli bir melodisi/ezgisi ve güftesi olmak
I can't remember how it goes.Musical pieces
SOUND/MOVEMENT B2 to make a particular sound or movement
belli bir ses çıkarmak veya hareket yapmak
My dog goes like this when he wants some food.General words for movement
(Definition of go verb from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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