illusion translate English to Turkish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "illusion" - English-Turkish dictionary

illusion

noun
 
 
/ɪˈluːʒən/
FALSE IDEA [C, U] an idea or belief that is not true
hayal, hülya, kuruntu
He had no illusions about his talents as a singer. We are not under any illusion - we know the work is dangerous.True, real, false, and unreal
DIFFERENT [C] something that is not really what it seems to be
göz aldanması, yanılsama
There is a large mirror at one end to create the illusion of more space. →  See also optical illusion True, real, false, and unreal
Translations of “illusion”
in Arabic وَهْم…
in Korean 환상…
in Malaysian ilusi…
in French illusion…
in Italian illusione…
in Chinese (Traditional) 幻覺,幻想, 假像,錯覺…
in Russian иллюзия, обман, впечатление…
in Polish złudzenie, iluzja…
in Vietnamese ảo tưởng…
in Spanish ilusión…
in Portuguese ilusão…
in Thai ภาพหลอน, ภาพมายา, ภาพลวงตา…
in German die Täuschung…
in Catalan il·lusió…
in Japanese 錯覚…
in Indonesian ilusi…
in Chinese (Simplified) 幻觉,幻想, 假象,错觉…
(Definition of illusion from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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