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Turkish translation of “like”

like

verb [T]
 
 
/laɪk/
A1 to enjoy something or feel that someone or something is pleasant
sevmek, hoşlanmak, keyif almak
[+ doing sth] I just like playing with my computer. [+ to do sth] I like to paint in my spare time. He really likes her. What do you like about him? → Opposite dislike verbLiking
not like to do sth/not like doing sth to not usually do something because you think it is wrong
bir şeyden/bir şeyi yapmaktan hoşlanmamak/zevk almamak
I don't like to criticize her too much.Refusing and rejectingMorality and rules of behaviour
would like sth A1 to want something
istemek, arzulamak, tercih etmek
[+ to do sth] I'd like to think about it. I'd like some chips with that, please.Wanting thingsHoping and hopefulness
Would you like...? A1 used to offer someone something
...ister misiniz?, ....arzu eder misiniz?, ...ne dersiniz?'
Would you like a drink? [+ to do sth] Would you like to eat now?Polite expressions
if you like used to say 'yes' when someone suggests a plan
'İstersen/Dilersen/Arzu edersen'
"Shall I come?" "If you like."Yes, no and not
A2 used when you offer someone something
'Tabi ki', 'Nasıl istersen', 'Buyur', 'Elbette', 'Eğer isterseniz'
If you like I could drive you there.Polite expressions
How do you like sb/sth? used to ask someone for their opinion
'Naslı buldun? Nasıl buldunuz?'
How do you like my new shoes?Expressing and asking opinionsRemarks and remarkingControlling emotions
(Definition of like verb from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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