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Turkish translation of “minute”

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minute

noun [C]
 
 
/ˈmɪnɪt/
60 SECONDS A1 a period of time equal to 60 seconds
dakika
She was ten minutes late for her interview. "Did you have a good holiday?" "Yes, thanks. I enjoyed every minute of it." a thirty-minute journeySpecific periods of time
SHORT TIME A2 a very short period of time
an, lahza, çok kısa müddet
It'll only take a minute to call him. I'll be with you in a minute. She died within minutes of (= very soon after) the attack.Short in timeTemporary
(at) any minute very soon
neredeyse, her an, şimdi; çok yakında; hemen
Her train should be arriving any minute.In the future and soon
the last minute B2 the latest time possible
son anda/dakikada
The concert was cancelled at the last minute.Late
the minute (that) as soon as
derhal, hemen; ...ar/er...maz/mez
I'll tell you the minute we hear any news.Simultaneous and consecutiveOrder and sequence
Wait/Just a minute; Hold on a minute. used when asking someone to wait for a short time
'Bir dakika!', 'Biraz bekle!', 'Az bekle!'
Just a minute - I've left my coat in the restaurant.WaitingStaying and remainingExpressions telling people to stop doing something
used when you disagree with something that someone has said or done
'Dur hele!', 'Bir dakika!', 'Hop hop!', 'Az dinle bir kez!'
Hold on a minute, Pete! I never said you could borrow my car.Arguing and disagreeing
(Definition of minute noun from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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