Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Turkish translation of “poor”

See all translations

poor

adjective
 
 
/pɔːr/ US  /pʊr/
NO MONEY A1 having very little money or few possessions
yoksul, fakir, fukara, zavallı
Most of these people are desperately poor. Modern fertilizers are too expensive for poorer countries to afford. housing for the poorPoverty and poor
BAD B2 of very low quality
kötü, fena, yetersiz, düşük kaliteli
poor health Last year's exam results were poor. a poor harvest The meeting went smoothly but attendance was poor (= not many people came).Not of good qualityRubbish and wasteInformal words for bad
NO SKILL B2 not having much skill at a particular activity
zayıf, yetersiz, kıt
She's always been poor at spelling.Not good enough
SYMPATHY [always before noun] A2 used to show sympathy for someone
zavallı, biçare
That cold sounds terrible, you poor thing.Sympathy and compassion
be poor in sth B2 If something is poor in a particular substance, it has very little of the substance.
zayıf/yetersiz/kıt olmak
Avoid foods which are high in calories but poor in nutrients.Lacking thingsScarce, inadequate and not enoughEssential or necessary
(Definition of poor from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “poor” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

piglet

a baby pig

Word of the Day

The way we move (Verbs for walking and running)

by Kate Woodford,
March 25, 2015
​​​ This week we’re looking at interesting ways to describe the way that people move. Most of the verbs that we’ll be considering describe how fast or slow people move. Others describe the attitude or state of mind of the person walking or running. Some describe both. Starting with verbs for walking slowly,

Read More 

stackin’ p

March 30, 2015
idiom slang earning a lot of money ‘That’s a very generous present.”Yeah, well, she’s stackin’ p, innit?’

Read More