precede translate English to Turkish: Cambridge Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Translation of "precede" - English-Turkish dictionary

precede

verb [T]
 
 
/priːˈsiːd/ formal
to happen or exist before something else
...dan/den önce gelmek/olmak; önden gelmek, önünde/önden gitmek
[often passive] The formal ceremony was preceded by a parade.Occurring and happeningPreceding and introducing
preceding adjective [always before noun] happening or coming before
önce/önden gelen; önce/önünde olan
the preceding monthsBefore, after and alreadyAfter and behindOccurring and happening
Translations of “precede”
in Vietnamese đi trước…
in Spanish preceder, anteceder…
in Thai อยู่ข้างหน้า…
in Malaysian mendahului…
in French précéder…
in German vorausgehen…
in Chinese (Traditional) (指時間或空間上)處在…之前,先於…
in Indonesian mendahului…
in Russian предшествовать…
in Chinese (Simplified) (指时间或空间上)处在…之前,先于…
in Polish poprzedzać…
(Definition of precede from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day
coeducational

having male and female students being taught together in the same school or college rather than separately

Word of the Day

Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
by Cambridge Dictionaries Online,
August 27, 2015
The English language is constantly changing. You know that. But did you know that at Cambridge Dictionaries Online we keep track of the changes? We continually add new words and new meanings to our online dictionary for learners of English. Some of them are new to English entirely (neologisms), and some

Read More 

hyperpalatable adjective
hyperpalatable adjective
August 24, 2015
describes food with heightened levels of sugar and salt, intended to be extremely appealing In Brazil, where the prevalence of overweight and obese adults has doubled since 1980, crisps, biscuits, energy bars and sugary drinks formulated to be ‘hyper-palatable’ are much more widely eaten than previously.

Read More