premium noun translate to Turkish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "premium" - English-Turkish dictionary

premium

noun
 
 
/ˈpriːmiəm/
PAYMENT [C] an amount of money you pay for insurance (= payments for an accident or illness)
prim, ek ödeme
How much is the monthly premium?InsuranceFinancial investments and the stock market
HIGH RATE [C] an amount or rate that is higher than average
ortalamanın üstünde oran/miktar
You pay a premium for apartments in the city centre.Big and quite bigEnormous
be at a premium If something useful is at a premium, there is not enough of it.
çok aranan, çok rağbette
Time is at a premium just before the start of exams.Scarce, inadequate and not enoughLacking thingsImportanceUseful or advantageous
place/put a premium on sth to consider a quality or achievement as very important
çok önem vermek, büyük değer vermek, özendirmek
She puts a premium on honesty.ImportanceUseful or advantageous
(Definition of premium noun from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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