route translate English to Turkish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "route" - English-Turkish dictionary

route

noun [C]
 
 
/ruːt/ US  /ruːt, raʊt/
ROADS B1 the roads or paths you follow to get from one place to another place
yol, güzergâh
an escape route Crowds gathered all along the route to watch the race.Routes and roads in general
METHOD a method of achieving something
usül, tarz, yöntem, yol
A university education is seen by many as the best route to a good job. →  See also en route Ways of achieving things
Translations of “route”
in Arabic طَرْيق…
in Korean 길, 노선…
in Malaysian laluan…
in French chemin, itinéraire…
in Italian itinerario, tragitto…
in Chinese (Traditional) 路線, 路途, 航線…
in Russian маршрут, средство, путь…
in Polish droga, trasa…
in Vietnamese lộ trình…
in Spanish camino, itinerario…
in Portuguese caminho, rota, trajeto…
in Thai เส้นทาง…
in German die Route…
in Catalan ruta…
in Japanese ルート, 道筋, 路線…
in Indonesian jalan…
in Chinese (Simplified) 路线, 路途, 航线…
(Definition of route from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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