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Translation of "speak" - English-Turkish dictionary

speak

verb     /spiːk/ ( past tense spoke, past participle spoken)
SAY WORDS [I]
A1 to say something using your voice konuşmak to speak loudly/quietly There was complete silence - nobody spoke.Saying and utteringSaying againWays of speaking
speak to sb mainly UK ( mainly US speak with sb)
to talk to someone biriyle konuşmak Could I speak to Mr Davis, please? Have you spoken with your new neighbors yet?Informal talking and conversation
speak about/of sth
to talk about something bir şey hakkında konuşmak He refused to speak about the matter in public.Informal talking and conversation
speak English/French/German, etc
A1 to be able to communicate in English/French/German, etc yabancı dil konuşmak Do you speak English?Using other languages
IN PUBLIC [I]
to make a speech to a large group of people konuşma yapmak She was invited to speak at a conference in Madrid.Lecturing and addressing
speak for/on behalf of sb
to express the feelings, opinions, etc of another person or of a group of people birisi adına konuşmak I've been chosen to speak on behalf of the whole class.Saying and utteringSaying againExpressing and asking opinionsRemarks and remarkingControlling emotions
generally/personally, etc speaking
B2 used to explain that you are talking about something in a general/personal, etc way genel/kişisel anlamda Personally speaking, I don't like cats.Informal talking and conversation
so to speak
used to explain that the words you are using do not have their usual meaning tâbiri caizse, deyim yerindeyse, neredeyse, âdeta, sanki →  See also speak/talk of the devil , speak your mind Figurative use of language
(Definition of speak from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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