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Turkish translation of “welcome”

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welcome

adjective
 
 
/ˈwelkəm/
B2 If something is welcome, people are pleased about it and want it to happen.
kabul gören, kabul edilen
a welcome change Your comments are very welcome. →  Opposite unwelcome Liked, or not liked, by many people
You're welcome. A2 used to be polite to someone who has thanked you
Rica ederim!', 'Bir şey değil!', 'Estağfurullah!', 'Teşekküre gerek yok!'
"Thank you." "You're welcome."Polite expressions
make sb (feel) welcome B1 to make a visitor feel happy and comfortable in a place by being kind and friendly to them
iyi karşılayıp memnun etmek, içtenlikle buyur etmek
They made me very welcome in their home.Meeting peopleOfficial meetings
be welcome to do sth B1 used to tell someone that they can certainly do something, if they want to
müsaade edilmiş olmak; izin verilmiş olmak; seve seve kabul edilmiş olmak
Anyone who is interested is welcome to come along.Freedom to actOpportunity
be welcome to sth used to tell someone that they can certainly have something, if they want it, because you do not
başının üstünde yeri olmak; memnuniyetle karşılıyor olmak
Giving, providing and supplying
Translations of “welcome”
in Korean 환영 합니다!…
in Arabic أهْلاً وسَهْلاً, مُرحّب بِه…
in French bienvenu…
in Italian benvenuto, gradito…
in Chinese (Traditional) 會面, 受歡迎的…
in Russian желанный, ценный…
in Polish mile widziany…
in Spanish bienvenido…
in Portuguese bem-vindo…
in German willkommen…
in Catalan benvingut…
in Japanese ようこそ, いらっしゃい, 歓迎されて…
in Chinese (Simplified) 会面, 受欢迎的…
(Definition of welcome adjective from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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