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Turkish translation of “work”

work

verb
 
 
/wɜːk/
JOB [I, T] A1 to do a job, especially the job you do to earn money
çalışmak
Helen works for a computer company. He works as a waiter in an Italian restaurant. My dad works very long hours (= he works a lot of hours).Work, working and the workplaceWorking hours and periods of work
MACHINE [I] A2 If a machine or piece of equipment works, it is not broken.
çalışmak, işlemek
Does this radio work? The washing machine isn't working.FunctioningPerforming a function
SUCCEED [I] B1 If something works, it is effective and successful.
işe yaramak, başarılı olmak, yürümek
Her plan to get rid of me didn't work.Performing a functionFunctioningSuccessful (things or people)
can work sth; know how to work sth to know how to use a machine or piece of equipment
çalıştırabilmek; nasıl çalışacağını bilmek
Do you know how to work the video recorder?FunctioningPerforming a functionUsing and misusing
EFFORT [I, T] to do something that needs a lot of time or effort, or to make someone do this
çalışmak, çabalamak, çalıştırmak
[+ to do sth] He's been working to improve his speed. Our teacher works us very hard.Effort and expending energyTrying and making an effort
work your way around/through/up, etc sth to achieve something gradually
yavaş yavaş başarmak
I have a pile of homework to work my way through.Succeeding, achieving and fulfilling
(Definition of work verb from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary English-Turkish © Cambridge University Press)
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