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Definición de “advantage” en inglés

advantage

noun uk   /ədˈvɑːn.tɪdʒ/ us    /-ˈvæn.t̬ɪdʒ/
B1 [C or U] a condition giving a greater chance of success: The advantage of booking tickets in advance is that you get better seats. Despite the twin advantages of wealth and beauty, she did not have a happy life. [+ to infinitive] It would be to your advantage (= it would improve the situation for you) to agree to his demands. For a goalkeeper, it's a great advantage to have big hands. His height and reach give him a big advantage over (= make him better than) other boxers.UK formal "Do you know how old I am?" "I'm afraid you have the advantage of me there (= you know the answer but I do not)." take advantage of sth B1 to use the good things in a situation: I thought I'd take advantage of the sports facilities while I'm here. take advantage of sb/sth B2 disapproving to treat someone badly in order to get something good from them: I think she takes advantage of his good nature. I know she's offered to babysit, but I don't want her to think we're taking advantage of her. [U] the word used in tennis when a player has won the point after deuce: Advantage Miss Williams! play advantage In games such as football, if a referee plays advantage, they do not stop the game when there is a foul because allowing play to continue gives an advantage to the team that has been fouled: The ref should have played advantage because Rooney would have been through on goal.
(Definition of advantage from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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