Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

El diccionario y el tesauro de inglés online más consultados por estudiantes de inglés.

Definición de “allow” en inglés

See all translations

allow

verb uk   /əˈlaʊ/ us  

allow verb (GIVE PERMISSION)

B1 [T] to give permission for someone to do something, or to not prevent something from happening: [+ to infinitive] Do you think Dad will allow you to go to Jamie's party? You're not allowed to talk during the exam. Her proposals would allow (= make it possible for) more people to stay in full-time education. The loophole has allowed hundreds of drink-drivers to avoid prosecution. The government has refused to allow foreign journalists into the area for several weeks. Prisoners have been moved to allow the demolition of part of the prison. Pets aren't allowed in this hotel. [+ -ing verb] Smoking is not allowed in this restaurant. [+ two objects] He didn't allow us enough time to finish the test. Red Cross officials were allowed access to the prison for the first time a few days ago. UK The referee decided to allow (= officially accept) the goal. At the weekend I allow myself (= I give myself the special pleasure of having) a box of chocolates. How much time do you allow yourself (= make available to yourself) to get ready in the morning?allow me old-fashioned a polite expression used when offering to help in some way: You can't carry all those bags yourself - please, allow me.
More examples

allow verb (ADMIT)

[+ that] formal to admit or agree that something is true: She allowed that she might have been too suspicious.
(Definition of allow from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
Más sobre la pronunciación de allow
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definiciones de “allow” en otros diccionarios

Palabra del día

lamb

a young sheep, or the flesh of a young sheep eaten as meat

Palabra del día

The way we move (Verbs for walking and running)

by Kate Woodford,
March 25, 2015
​​​ This week we’re looking at interesting ways to describe the way that people move. Most of the verbs that we’ll be considering describe how fast or slow people move. Others describe the attitude or state of mind of the person walking or running. Some describe both. Starting with verbs for walking slowly,

Aprende más 

crossfit noun

March 23, 2015
high-intensity strength training Two women in strappy dresses discussed how much weight they could snatch

Aprende más