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Definición de “bail” en inglés

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bail

noun uk   /beɪl/ us  

bail noun (MONEY)

[U] an amount of money that a person who has been accused of a crime pays to a law court so that they can be released until their trial. The payment is a way of making certain that the person will return to court for trial: He was released/remanded on bail (of $100,000). Because of a previous conviction, the judge refused to grant bail (= allow the accused person to be released). Her parents have agreed to put up/stand ( US also post) (= pay) bail for her.

bail noun (CRICKET)

bails [plural] the two small pieces of wood on top of the stumps in a game of cricket, that can be knocked off with the ball to make the player who is batting (= hitting the ball) out

bail

verb uk   /beɪl/ us  

bail verb (REMOVE WATER)

[I] ( UK also bale) to remove water from a boat using a container: The boat's sinking! Start bailing quickly!

bail verb (MONEY)

[T] If someone accused of a crime is bailed, they are released until their trial after paying bail to the court: She was yesterday bailed for three weeks on drink-driving offences. [+ to infinitive] He was bailed to appear at the Magistrates' Court next month.
Traducciones de “bail”
en coreano 보석금…
en árabe كَفالة…
en francés caution…
en turco kefalet, kefalet ücreti…
en italiano cauzione…
en chino (tradicionál) 錢, 保釋金…
en ruso залог…
en polaco kaucja…
en español fianza…
en portugués fiança, liberdade sob fiança…
en alemán die Kaution…
en catalán fiança…
en japonés 保釈…
en chino (simplificado) 钱, 保释金…
(Definition of bail from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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