block - definición en el diccionario inglés británico y tesauro - Cambridge Dictionaries Online
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Definición de “block” en inglés

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blocknoun

uk   /blɒk/  us   /blɑːk/

block noun (AREA)

A2 [C] mainly US the distance along a street from where one road crosses it to the place where the next road crosses it, or one part of a street like this, especially in a town or city: The museum is just six blocks away. My friend and I live on the same block.A2 [C] a square group of buildings or houses with roads on each side: I took a walk around the block.round/around the block on the next street that crosses this street: He lives just around the block.
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block noun (PIECE)

B2 [C] a solid, straight-sided piece of hard material: a block of wood/icethe block [S] (in the past) a large piece of wood on which criminals had their head cut off: Anne Boleyn went to (= was killed on) the block.
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block noun (BUILDING)

B1 [C] a large, usually tall building divided into separate parts for use as offices or homes by several different organizations or people: an office blockUK a tower blockUK a block of flats

block noun (GROUP)

[C] a group of things bought, dealt with, or considered together: a block of tickets/seats/shares Corporate hospitality firms make block bookings (= buy large numbers of seats) at big sporting events.

block noun (OBJECT BLOCKING)

C2 [C usually singular] something that blocks a tube or opening: A block in (= an object blocking) the pipe was preventing the water from coming through.
Synonym

blockverb [T]

uk   /blɒk/  us   /blɑːk/
B2 to prevent movement through something: A fallen tree is blocking the road. As she left the court, an angry crowd tried to block her way.C1 to be between someone and the thing they are looking at, so that they cannot see: My view was blocked by a tall man in front of me.C2 to stop something from happening or succeeding: She was very talented and I felt her parents were blocking her progress. A group of politicians blocked the proposal.
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blocked
adjective uk   /blɒkt/  us   /blɑːkt/
The road is blocked - you'll have to go round the other way. I've got a blocked (up) nose.
(Definition of block from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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