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Definición de “cold” en inglés

cold

adjective uk   /kəʊld/ us    /koʊld/

cold adjective (LOW TEMPERATURE)

A1 at a low temperature, especially when compared to the temperature of the human body, and not hot, or warm: a cold day/house cold food/water cold hands cold weather My feet are so cold. It's freezing cold today. You'll feel cold if you don't wear a coat.

cold adjective (UNFRIENDLY)

B1 not showing kindness, love, or emotion and not friendly: His handshake was cold, and his eyes lifeless. He stared into her cold blue eyes. She would never feel welcome in this city with its cold, unsmiling inhabitants. The school was a cold, unwelcoming place.
coldness
noun [U] uk   /ˈkəʊld.nəs/ us    /ˈkoʊld-/
C2 It was the coldness of her manner that struck me.

cold

noun uk   /kəʊld/ us    /koʊld/

cold noun (ILLNESS)

A2 [C] a common infection, especially in the nose and throat, that often causes a cough, a slight fever, and sometimes some pain in the muscles: I've got a cold. She caught a cold at school.UK informal Don't come near me - I've got a stinking/streaming cold (= extremely bad cold).

cold noun (LOW TEMPERATURE)

B1 [S or U] cold weather or temperatures: Don't stand out there in the cold, come in here and get warm. Old people tend to feel the cold (= feel uncomfortable in cold temperatures) more than the young. My feet were numb with cold.
(Definition of cold from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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