Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

El diccionario y el tesauro de inglés online más consultados por estudiantes de inglés.

Definición de “come” en inglés

come

verb uk   /kʌm/ (came, come) us  

come verb (MOVE TO SPEAKER)

A1 [I] to move or travel towards the speaker or with the speaker: Are you coming with me? There's a car coming! Can you come to my party? Here comes Adam. She's come 500 km (= has travelled 500 km) to be here with us tonight. If you're ever in Dublin, come and visit us. We came by car. Your father will come for (= to collect) you at four o'clock. Come forward a bit and stand on the line. I've come straight from the airport. The door opened and a nurse came into the room. [+ to infinitive] A man's coming to mend the boiler this afternoon. As he came towards me, I could see he'd been crying. He thought we'd been picking his apples and came after (= chased) us with a stick. [+ -ing verb] He came rushing over when I fell.

come verb (MOVE TO LISTENER)

A1 [I] to move or travel in the direction of the person being spoken to: "Sal, are you ready?" "Coming." I'll come and pick you up in the car if you like. I've come for (= come to collect) your census form. [+ to infinitive] I've come to read the gas meter.

come verb (ARRIVE)

A1 [I] to get to a particular place: Has she come yet? When does the post come? Hasn't his train come in yet?

come verb (LEAVE)

[I + adv/prep] to leave a place: I had to come away from the party early. The police watched him come out of the house.

come verb (DIFFERENT STATE)

C2 [L] to change or develop so as to be in a different position or condition: Those pictures will have to come down (= be removed from the wall). He pulled the knob and it just came off (in his hand). How many times have you come off that horse? Two of his teeth came out after he got hit in the face. Can you get this cork to come out of the bottle? When does the heating come on (= start working)? [+ adj] A wire has come loose at the back. The door came open for no apparent reason.

come verb (HAPPEN)

B2 [I] to happen: Spring has come early. The announcement came at a bad time. Her resignation came as quite a shock.informal Come Monday morning (= when it is Monday morning) you'll regret staying up all night. I'm afraid those days are gone and they'll never come again.

come verb (BE ORDERED)

come after, first, last, etc. B1 to have or achieve a particular position in a race, competition, list, etc.: She came second (US came in second) in the 100 metres. Z comes after Y in the alphabet. Which king came after Edward? April comes before May. I know the first verse of the song, but I don't know what comes next.

come verb (EXIST)

A2 [I + adv/prep, not continuous] to exist or be available: Do these trousers come in any other colour? Runners come in all shapes and sizes - fat and thin, short and tall. This cuddly baby doll comes with her own blanket and bottle. They're the best sunglasses you can buy, but they don't come cheap (= they are expensive).
come to do sth C2 to start to do something: I've come to like her over the months. It used to hold paper bags, but gradually came to be used for magazines. How did that phrase come to mean (= develop so that it means) that?

come verb (SEX)

[I] to have an orgasm

come

noun [U] uk   /kʌm/ slang us  
(Definition of come from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
Más sobre la pronunciación de come
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definiciones de “come” en otros diccionarios

Tesauro SMART: General words for movement

“come”: synonyms and related words:

También encontrarás palabras, frases y sinónimos relacionados con los temas:

Palabra del día

light at the end of the tunnel

signs of improvement in a situation that has been bad for a long time, or signs that a long and difficult piece of work is almost finished

Palabra del día

The language of work

by Kate Woodford,
October 15, 2014
Most of us talk about our jobs. We tell our family and friends interesting or funny things that have happened in the workplace (=room where we do our job), we describe – and sometimes complain about – our bosses and colleagues and when we meet someone for the first time, we tell

Aprende más 

spoonula noun

October 13, 2014
a cooking implement that is a combination of a spoon and a spatula Pour the mixture back into the pan and cook on low-medium, scraping and folding the mixture with a silicone spoonula (I love this one).

Aprende más