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Definición de “command” en inglés

command

noun uk   /kəˈmɑːnd/ us    /-ˈmænd/

command noun (ORDER)

B2 [C] an order, especially one given by a soldier: You will run forward at (= when you hear) my command. When I give the command, fire! He hated being in the army because he had to obey commands. C2 [U] control over someone or something and responsibility for him, her, or it: Colonel Sailing has command over/is in command of the Guards Regiment. Lee took command of the Confederate Army in 1862. The soldiers were under the command of a tough sergeant major.

command noun (COMPUTER)

C1 [C] an instruction to a computer to perform a particular action

command noun (KNOWLEDGE)

B2 [S or U] a great knowledge of a subject and an ability to use that knowledge: She has an impressive command of the English language.

command noun (VIEW)

[S] formal a view: the castle's position with its command of the surrounding countryside

command

verb uk   /kəˈmɑːnd/ us    /-ˈmænd/

command verb (ORDER)

[I or T] to give someone an order: [+ to infinitive] The officer commanded his men to shoot. [+ that] He commanded that the troops (should) cross the water. [I or T] to control someone or something and tell them or it what to do: Colonel Sailing commands the Guards Regiment.

command verb (RECEIVE)

[T] to deserve and get something good, such as attention, respect, or a lot of money: She was one of those teachers who just commanded respect. She commands one of the highest fees per film in Hollywood.

command verb (VIEW)

[T] formal to give a view: The master bedroom commands a view of rolling green hills.
(Definition of command noun, verb from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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