compare - definición en el diccionario inglés británico y tesauro - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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Definición de “compare” en inglés

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compare

verb [T] uk   /kəmˈpeər/  us   /-per/

compare verb [T] (EXAMINE DIFFERENCES)

B1 to examine or look for the difference between two or more things: If you compare house prices in the two areas, it's quite amazing how different they are. That seems expensive - have you compared prices in other shops? Compare some recent work with your older stuff and you'll see how much you've improved. This road is quite busy compared to/with ours. Children seem to learn more interesting things compared to/with when we were at school.
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compare verb [T] (CONSIDER SIMILARITIES)

to judge, suggest, or consider that something is similar or of equal quality to something else: The poet compares his lover's tongue to a razor blade. Still only 25, she has been compared to the greatest dancer of all time. People compared her to Elizabeth Taylor. You can't compare the two cities - they're totally different.does not compare If something or someone does not compare with something or someone else, the second thing is very much better than the first: Instant coffee just doesn't compare with freshly ground coffee.compare favourably If something compares favourably with something else, it is better than it: The hotel certainly compared favourably with the one we stayed in last year.

compare

noun uk   /kəmˈpeər/  us   /-per/ literary
beyond compare so good that everyone or everything else is of worse quality: Her beauty is beyond compare.
(Definition of compare from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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