Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

El diccionario y el tesauro de inglés online más consultados por estudiantes de inglés.

Definición de “couple” en inglés

couple

noun uk   /ˈkʌp.l̩/ us  

couple noun (SOME)

B1 [S] two or a few things that are similar or the same, or two or a few people who are in some way connected: The doctor said my leg should be better in a couple of days. A couple of people objected to the proposal, but the vast majority approved of it. We'll have to wait another couple of hours for the paint to dry. She'll be retiring in a couple more years. The weather's been terrible for the last couple of days. Many economists expect unemployment to fall over the next couple of months. I'm sorry I didn't phone you, but I've been very busy over the past couple of weeks.

couple noun (TWO PEOPLE)

B1 [C, + sing/pl verb] two people who are married or in a romantic or sexual relationship, or two people who are together for a particular purpose: a married couple An elderly couple live (US lives) next door. Should the government do more to help young couples buy their own homes? The couple skated spectacularly throughout the competition.

couple

verb uk   /ˈkʌp.l̩/ us  

couple verb (JOIN)

[T usually passive, usually + adv/prep] to join or combine: The sleeping car and restaurant car were coupled together. High inflation coupled with low output spells disaster for the government in the election.

couple verb (HAVE SEX)

[I] formal When two people or two animals couple, they have sex.
(Definition of couple from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
Más sobre la pronunciación de couple
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definiciones de “couple” en otros diccionarios

Palabra del día

yo

used as an informal greeting between people who know each other or as an expression of approval

Palabra del día

Come on – you can do it! Phrasal verbs with ‘come’.

by Liz Walter​,
November 19, 2014
As part of an occasional series on the tricky subject of phrasal verbs, this blog looks at ones formed with the verb ‘come’. If you are reading this blog, I’m sure you already know come from, as it is one of the first things you learn in class: I come from Scotland/Spain.

Aprende más 

silver splicer noun

November 17, 2014
informal a person who marries in later life Newly retired and now newlywed – rise of the ‘silver splicers’ Reaching pension age becomes a trigger to tie the knot as baby-boomers begin to redefine retirement

Aprende más