crisp - definición en el diccionario inglés británico y tesauro - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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Definición de “crisp” en inglés

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crisp

adjective uk   us   /krɪsp/ mainly approving

crisp adjective (HARD)

hard enough to be broken easily used to describe cooked foods, such as pastry and biscuits, that are well cooked so that they are just dry and hard enough Crisp fruit or vegetables are fresh and firm: a crisp appleC2 Crisp paper or cloth is stiff and smooth: a crisp new £5 note/a crisp white tablecloth

crisp adjective (CLEAR)

A crisp sound or image is very clear: Now that we have cable, we get a wonderfully crisp picture. A crisp way of speaking, writing, or behaving is quick, confident, and effective: a crisp reply a crisp, efficient manner

crisp adjective (COLD)

C2 Crisp weather is cold, dry, and bright: a wonderful crisp spring morning Crisp air is cold, dry, and fresh: I breathed in deeply the crisp mountain air.
crisply
adverb uk   us   /-li/
crispness
noun [U] uk   us   /-nəs/

crisp

noun uk   us   /krɪsp/

crisp noun (POTATO)

A2 [C usually plural] UK (US chip, potato chip) a very thin, often round piece of fried potato, sometimes with a flavour added, sold especially in plastic bags: a packet of salt and vinegar crisps
More examples

crisp noun (SWEET FOOD)

[C] US (UK crumble) a sweet dish made from fruit covered in a mixture of flour, butter, and sugar rubbed together into small pieces, baked, and eaten hot: apple crisp
(Definition of crisp from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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