crush - definición en el diccionario inglés británico y tesauro - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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Definición de “crush” en inglés

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crush

verb uk   us   /krʌʃ/

crush verb (PRESS)

C2 [T] to press something very hard so that it is broken or its shape is destroyed: The package had been badly crushed in the post. Add three cloves of crushed garlic. His arm was badly crushed in the car accident. [T] to press paper or cloth so that it becomes full of folds and is no longer flat: My dress got all crushed in my suitcase. [T] If people are crushed against other people or things, they are pressed against them: Tragedy struck when several people were crushed to death in the crowd.
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crush verb (SHOCK)

[T usually passive] to upset or shock someone badly: He was crushed by the news of the accident.

crush verb (BEAT)

[T] to defeat someone completely: The president called upon the army to help crush the rebellion. France crushed Wales by 36 to 3 in last Saturday's match in Paris.

crush

noun uk   us   /krʌʃ/

crush noun (LIKING)

C2 [C] informal a strong but temporary feeling of liking someone: She has a crush on one of her teachers at school.

crush noun (PRESS)

C2 [S] a crowd of people forced to stand close together: I had to struggle through the crush to get to the door. You can come in our car, but it'll be a bit of a crush (= there will be a lot of people in it).
(Definition of crush from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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