dark - definición en el diccionario inglés británico y tesauro - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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Definición de “dark” en inglés

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dark

adjective uk   /dɑːk/  us   /dɑːrk/

dark adjective (WITHOUT LIGHT)

A2 with little or no light: It was too dark to see much. What time does it get dark in the summer? Our bedroom was very dark until we put a larger window in.A1 nearer to black than white in colour: dark blue/green dark clouds She has dark hair. He was tall, dark (= with black/brown hair) and handsome.
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dark adjective (SAD)

C1 [before noun] sad and without hope: Her husband's sudden death was the start of a dark chapter in her life. This environmental report contains more dark predictions about the future of the Earth.

dark adjective (EVIL)

C1 evil or threatening: There's a darker side to his character.

dark adjective (SECRET)

UK secret or hidden: I've just been promoted, but keep it dark - I don't want everyone to know just yet.
darkness
noun [U] uk   us   /-nəs/
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B2 The city centre was plunged into darkness by the power cut.

dark

noun uk   /dɑːk/  us   /dɑːrk/
the dark
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B1 the fact of there being no light somewhere: Cats can see in the dark. I've always been afraid of the dark.
before/after dark B1 before/after the sun has gone down: It isn't safe to leave the house after dark. I want to be home before dark.
(Definition of dark from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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