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Definición de “demand” en inglés

demand

verb [T] uk   /dɪˈmɑːnd/ us    /-ˈmænd/

demand verb [T] (REQUEST)

B1 to ask for something forcefully, in a way that shows that you do not expect to be refused: I demanded an explanation. The car workers' union is demanding a seven percent pay rise this year. He has always demanded the highest standards of behaviour from his children. [+ speech] "And where do you think you're going?" demanded the police officer. [+ to infinitive] I demand to see the manager. [+ that] She demanded that he return the books he borrowed from her.

demand verb [T] (NEED)

B2 to need something such as time, effort, or a particular quality: This is a very difficult piece of music to play - it demands a lot of concentration. He seems to lack many of the qualities demanded of (= needed by) a successful politician.

demand

noun uk   /dɪˈmɑːnd/ us    /-ˈmænd/

demand noun (REQUEST)

B1 [C] a strong request: You can't give in to children's demands all the time. The government is unlikely to agree to the rebels' demands for independence.UK They received a final demand (= a last request) for payment.

demand noun (NEED)

B2 [C or U] a need for something to be sold or supplied: There was little demand for tickets. Good teachers are always in (great) demand (= are always needed). demands [plural] the difficult things that you have to do: The demands of nursing are too great for a lot of people. His new job makes a lot of demands on him (= he has to work very hard).
(Definition of demand from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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